Marking 40 Years of Peace with Egypt: Screening of “Arab Movie” With Eyal Sagi Bizawi

Tuesday, April 2 at 8 pm

In conjunction with Ilit Azoulay’s “Regarding Silences” exhibition, the CCA Tel Aviv marks 40 years of peace between Israel and Egypt with a screening of “Arab Movie” (2015) and discussion with the director, Eyal Sagi Bizawi, on cultural relations and missed opportunities between the two countries.

Eyal Sagi Bisawi, an acclaimed cultural theorist and film critic, was inspired by his two Egyptian-Jewish grandmothers to “Arab Movie,” which won Best Documentary at the Docaviv Film Festival 2015. When Israel only had one, predominantly Arabic TV channel, Israelis of all backgrounds fondly remember the Friday afternoon ritual of watching bootlegged Egyptian movies. Israel and Egypt were at war, but were momentarily united by the same cultural icons.

About the Speaker Eyal Sagi Bisawi is a cultural theorist and Egyptian film researcher with a BA in Arabic Literature and Middle Eastern History from the Tel Aviv University, and an MA in Cultural Studies from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Bisawi lectures on cinema and popular culture in the Arab world and writes a column for Ha’aretz newspaper (since 2014). He was awarded the Sapir Prize for Literature in 2016, served as a lector for documentary films at the Rabinowitz Foundation grant program (2016-2015), and was a content editor and researcher of documentary films. “Arab Movie” (2015) is his first documentary film. It won first prize in the Art and Culture category at the Docaviv Film Festival (2015), and was broadcast on Israeli television.

*The event will be held in Hebrew. Number of seats are limited, tickets required.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Wednesday, September 9 at 8:00 pm Please join us for a reading of extracts from Eden, Eden, Eden by Pierre Guyotat. Since its release with the legendary publishing house Gallimard in 1970, this book b

Started in the year 2000 and pursued until 2016, Irma Blank’s versatile and prolific cycle Global Writings originated from the creation of the eponymous alphabet, composed by eight consonant letters f