Noam Enbar and Yonatan Levy: ANTIGONE

Part of Conditions of Political Choreography

“When a person begins to slow down in his identification process, there are many ways to renew the flow, usually growing out of the particular way he has talked up to that point. I may suggest he say something to the group as his animal or object, or perhaps wave my magic wand and allow him to make one change for the better in himself as the object. If a person comes to hate the object (himself), I may suggest he choose another, and then create a dialogue between the two.” John B. Enright, Thou art that: Projection and play in therapy and growth, (San Franscisco: Lodestar Press, 1971), pp.1952-3

Yonatan Levy (b. 1974 in Montreal, lives in Kiryat Tivon) is a playwright, actor, poet, writer, and educator. He creates humorous works using mystical, ritualistic, and cultic elements that have been showcased in venues including the Israel Museum, Jerusalem; the Acco Theater Festival; the Schaubühne, Berlin; and the Jerusalem Season of Culture.

 Noam Enbar (b. 1978 in Israel, lives in Tel Aviv) is a singer, composer and performer. Enbar is the founder of the radical Post-Rock band Habiluim and the Klezmer-Anarcho-Punk ensemble Oy Division. Enbar has written music for a number of feature films including Z32 (2008 Venice Film Festival), Once I Entered a Garden (2012 Rome Film Festival) and Between Fences (2016 Berlinale), directed by Avi Mograbi. Enbar composed and musically directed the musical-theatrical works The General and the Sea and Nefilim, both directed by Yonatan Levy. In 2015 Enbar founded The Great Gehenna Choir, which performs his original music.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Wednesday, September 9 at 8:00 pm Please join us for a reading of extracts from Eden, Eden, Eden by Pierre Guyotat. Since its release with the legendary publishing house Gallimard in 1970, this book b

Started in the year 2000 and pursued until 2016, Irma Blank’s versatile and prolific cycle Global Writings originated from the creation of the eponymous alphabet, composed by eight consonant letters f