On Collective Knowledge

While collective intelligence is not new, today’s technologies allow massive numbers of people around the world to collaborate and learn in new ways. Three speakers — Alon Hasgal, Ido Kenan, and Galit Wellner — will discuss how we can understand this concept and take advantage of its growing possibilities.

About the Speakers

For the past 20 years, Ido Kenan has been active online, blogging at Room 404, giving lectures about technology and covering digital culture for a variety of online and offline publications.

Dr. Alon Hasgall is a Senior Lecturer and Head of the Technological Infrastructure Management Program at the Center for Academic Studies, Director of the Institute for Technological Innovation, Director of Start-Up Companies. Hasgall explores the connection between technology and society, and is an expert on innovation, knowledge management, and adaptive complex systems, subjects on which he has published numerous articles and lectured at conferences.

Dr. Galit Wellner is an assistant professor at the NB School of Design Haifa, Israel and an adjunct professor at Tel Aviv University. She studies digital technologies and their inter-relations with humans. She is an active member of the Postphenomenology Community that studies the philosophy of technology. Her book A Postphenomenological Inquiry of Cellphones: Genealogies, Meanings and Becoming was published in 2015 in Lexington Books. She translated to Hebrew Don Ihde’s book Postphenomenology and Technoscience (Resling 2016). Galit was the vice-chair of Israeli UNESCO’s Information for All Program (IFAP), a board member of the FTTH Council Europe, and a founder of a startup.

Monday July 10 at 7 pm

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